Yiquan #8:  8 static postures

Read previous posts: A historic background and theory of Yiquan #1; Yiquan #2, Yiquan  #3, Yiquan #4; Yiquan #5, Yiquan #6, Yiquan #7. The Yiquan set that I present in the posts about Yiquan is composed of 8 static postures. In this last post I will present the seventh and eighth position. Seventh position This position strongly develops the energy which we emanate through our eyes. This exercise helps to raise Qi and flow of energy to[…]

Read more

Yiquan #7:  8 static postures

Read previous posts: A historic background and theory of Yiquan #1; Yiquan #2, Yiquan  #3, Yiquan #4, Yiquan #5, Yiquan #6. The Yiquan set that I present in the posts about Yiquan is composed of 8 static postures. See previous posts for the first five postures. In this post I present the sixth posture. In all eight or ten positions you are standing seemingly still, but the truth is far more complex. For example your[…]

Read more

Yiquan #6:  8 static postures

Read previous posts: A historic background and theory of Yiquan #1; Yiquan #2, Yiquan  #3, Yiquan #4, Yiquan #5. The Yiquan set that I present in the posts about Yiquan is composed of 8 static postures. Today I continue with the fourth and fifth positions. Fourth position This position strongly connects sides of lower and upper part of the body with lower Dantien. Palms are pressing downwards and that causes the Dai Mai or Belt[…]

Read more

Yiquan #5:  8 static postures

Read previous posts: A historic background and theory of Yiquan #1, Yiquan #2, Yiquan  #3, Yiquan #4 The Yiquan set that I will present in next posts is composed of 8 static postures. Stand in a normal stance which is modified and light version of horse stance, which is lower and wider. You are standing in the normal stance. Which means you are in a shoulder width stance approximately. Your knees are lightly bent and your[…]

Read more

Yiquan #4: a historic background and theory

Read previous posts: Yiquan #1, Yiquan #2 and Yiquan #3 What would Qigong be like without the energy, Qi? It would be only a Gong. So, only a time and an effort which is the literal meaning of the word »Gong« in Chinese. In our context, it would mean only physical exercises, done without the purpose of cultivation of  the whole being including the energy aspect. We are dealing with an art Qigong is an[…]

Read more

Yiquan #3: a historic background and theory

Read previous posts: Yiquan #1 and Yiquan #2 In the previous post we have touched the Yang aspect of the energy flow in Yiquan practice, today we will discuss the Yin aspect of this training. Yin and Yang and Qi In the previous post  I was describing the path of Qi going downwards, or how you, practitioner, are leading the Qi in downfall current. I also said that this current can be blocked and drained[…]

Read more

Yiquan #2: a historic background and theory

Read previous post: Yiquan #1 It’s been a while since I have started with standing meditation practice Zhan Zhuang and I was eager to go deeper with it. The expansion of time practicing didn’t bring the results I was anticipating, so I searched a bit further and I found Yiquan. Here in these few posts about Yiquan I present the practice that was developed and simplified from the original practice by very known Xingyiquan master[…]

Read more

Yiquan #1: a historic background and theory

Yiquan (or Yichuan, I Chuan, I Quan) is a martial art, which derives from Xingyiquan and therefore its roots are seen in postures, mindset and purpose of training. It is internal martial art as well as internal meditative practice. Xingyiquan is translated as »Form-intention-fist« and when Xing is removed and only »intention fist« remains, you get Yiquan. Static practice This practice is very static, since the majority of practice is composed of static postures in[…]

Read more